October 2016 Newsletter

Posted: November 21, 2016 5:14 pm
Mark Your Calendars
 

Date: 11/10/16
Topic: The Senior Experience: What We Think It Is, What it Really Is, and How We Can Make It Better
Sponsor: The Holmstad
Location/Time: The Holmstad, 831 North Batavia Ave, Batavia, IL / 8:30-10:00 AM
Contact/Registration: email
contactus@lcius.com
Flyer

Date: 11/16/16
Topic: My Life is a Struggle But I Don’t Want Help: Senior Resistance to Change and Care
Sponsor: The Summit of Uptown
Location/Time: The Summit of Uptown, 10 N. Summit, Park Ridge, IL  / 4:30-6:30 PM
Contact/Registration: email
contactus@lcius.com 

©Lifecare Innovations, Inc
 

Older Americans: Facts and Figures  
  

The Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics recently published its 2016 report on a host of facets impacting life for those aged 65 and older. The report is over 200 pages along, inclusive of graphs, charts, references and glossary, and lays out an array of facts and figures that provide a window into the lives and challenges of those over 65. Below are some of the more interesting findings:
  • By 2030, the American population aged 65 or over will balloon to an estimated 74 million, representing 21% of the total U.S. population. In 2014, the number of Americans age 65 or more numbered only 46 million.
  • Obesity has increased among older Americans, just as it has in other age groups. In 2011-2014, 35% were considered obese, whereas in 1988-1994, just 22% fell into this category.

 Continue Reading 

©Lifecare Innovations, Inc

 


A Moving Experience:
A Special Boy On a Singular Journey
 

Shay Jacobson, RN, MA, NMG, LNCC, CNLCP

Martha Kern

Most of us remember at least one occasion in childhood when we were the “new kid”. In this almost universal childhood story, there is a crazy casserole of new house, new room, new school, new teacher, new friends, and the unsettled feeling of not quite knowing where we belong.

These stressors were hard to measure in nine-year-old Kyle’s case. He cannot speak and can hear only a little out of one ear. His vision is poor. Walking is difficult for him and his muscles are weak. An accident at birth triggered for him a diagnosis of hypotonic cerebral palsy, which made moving from room to room difficult and moving from home to home exceptionally complex.

Still, the prospect of a new house and school was too grand an opportunity for Kyle’s parents to ignore. They lived in a small ranch house with Kyle and his two siblings, sharing one bathroom, three bedrooms and a host of issues. In addition to Kyle’s profound disability, there was his father’s near-fatal stroke to consider, and his older brother’s autism spectrum disorder. It was a lot for one family to absorb.

 

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©Lifecare Innovations, Inc 


Weeding the Garden:
Thinning Personal Property in the Second Half
of Life

 

Shay Jacobson, RN, MA, NMG, LNCC, CNLCP

 Martha Kern

In its own unique way, personal property tells the story of life.  The first half of life is about acquiring as much personal property as we can reasonably house, and the second half is about trying to get rid of it all.

As young adults, we acquire our own places to live and rush to fill these yawning, empty spaces.  If we’re lucky, we prosper, have families and move to ever larger quarters.  These new spaces call for more furniture and decoration, and the children clamor for more toys and accessories.  Many of us go on to fill garages, sheds and storage units, as well.

Eventually, the day comes when the children launch and begin their own acquisition campaigns.  The parents, now entering the second half of life, begin to contemplate downsizing so they can spend more time travelling and less time vacuuming.  Every inch of their four-bedroom house is occupied by papers of unknown origin, outgrown clothing, inherited figurines from the prior generation, boxes of grade school art, prom dresses, toys, framed art, photo albums, craft supplies, holiday decorations and excess furniture.  Continue Reading

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©Lifecare Innovations, Inc 
 

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